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Answers to your Heartburn and ZANTAC® FAQs

Answers to your Heartburn and ZANTAC® FAQs

Heartburn FAQs

Q: What is heartburn?

Heartburn is a painful burning sensation you feel in your chest caused by acid reflux47.

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Q: What is acid reflux?

Acid reflux occurs when your stomach acid moves up into your esophagus, causing a burning pain in the chest (heartburn). This process can also lead to symptoms of acid reflux including heartburn in your chest and potentially in your throat, sour bitter-tasting regurgitation in your throat, bloating, burping, hiccups, nausea, wheezing, chronic sore throat and dysphagia (difficulty or discomfort in swallowing).

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Q: What causes heartburn?

Heartburn is caused by the acid in your stomach rising up and into your esophagus50. Food and certain beverages are the most common heartburn triggers. Your stomach may react to some foods by increasing acid production, slowing down digestion, or inhibiting the esophageal sphincter’s ability to prevent stomach contents from leaking back into the esophagus. Tomatoes, fatty foods, and coffee are among the usual suspects. Read more about heartburn causes here.

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Q: What foods cause Heartburn?

While what you eat can play a role in triggering heartburn, the foods that cause heartburn will vary from person to person. Common food types include spicy foods, acidic foods (such as citrus fruits or tomatoes) and greasy foods.

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Q: How long does heartburn usually last?

Heartburn can last for up to 2 hours. In some cases, heartburn can last longer than 2 hours51.

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Q: What should I do if I am experiencing chronic or severe heartburn?

If you are experiencing severe or chronic (long-term) heartburn, you may have GERD. Talk to a healthcare professional about your symptoms to establish treatment and potential lifestyle changes52.

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Q: What Is GERD?

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic (long-term) condition when people experience heartburn caused by acid reflux.

GERD is a broad term applied to patients with symptoms suggestive of acid reflux and complications arising from it. GERD in a person with symptoms fewer than two times per week with a short duration and relatively low pain is considered to be mild. A patient with more episodes in a week is classified as moderate to severe.

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Q: What causes heartburn during pregnancy?

Increased levels of the hormone progesterone have the effect of relaxing the valve separating the stomach from the esophagus. This can enable stomach acid to escape, irritating the esophagus and causing heartburn. 

Later in pregnancy as your baby takes up more room, this extra pressure on your stomach can also push acids up into your esophagus.53Speak to your doctor before taking ZANTAC® if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

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ZANTAC® FAQs

Q: How does ZANTAC® work?

ZANTAC® tablets work by reducing the production of excess stomach acid, which causes the burning and discomfort of heartburn and acid indigestion.

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Q: When should I take ZANTAC®?

ZANTAC® can be taken either in response to Heartburn symptoms or prior to meal consumption to help prevent heartburn. ZANTAC® can be taken with or without food.

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Q: Which ZANTAC® product should I use?

If you are experiencing mild heartburn, your symptoms are new or this is your first time taking ZANTAC®, ZANTAC® Regular Strength is recommended. If you are experiencing more severe heartburn, try ZANTAC® Maximum Strength.

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Q: What are the possible side effects to taking ZANTAC®?

Stop taking ZANTAC® and consult your doctor if you start experiencing signs of an allergic reaction. These signs include hives, difficulty breathing, and swelling (face, lips, tongue, and throat).

Other side effects may include54:

  • Headache
  • Stomach pain
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation or diarrhea 
  • For a more complete list of side effects see the package insert.

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Q: Can I take ZANTAC® with other medications?

ZANTAC® might interact with other medications. If you are on medication, consult with your healthcare professional before taking ZANTAC®55.

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Q: Can I take ZANTAC® if I have a medical condition?

Do not take ZANTAC® if you are allergic to ranitidine. Consult with your medical professional if you have a kidney or liver disease, or porphyria56.

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Q: Can I take ZANTAC® if I am pregnant?

Speak with your healthcare professional if you become or plan on becoming pregnant while taking ZANTAC®57.  The safety of Zantac in pregnancy has not been established.

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Q: Is ZANTAC® safe to take if I am nursing?

ZANTAC® contains ranitidine, which passes into breast milk. Before taking ZANTAC® while breastfeeding, consult with your healthcare professional58.

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Q: Can my children take ZANTAC®?

Children 16 years and older can take ZANTAC®. Before giving ZANTAC® to children younger than 16 years of age, consult with your healthcare professional. Do not give ZANTAC® to your child if he or she is allergic to ranitidine or has a liver or kidney disease, or porphyria.59

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